Russian cities introduce baby ‘drop boxes’ to stop unwanted children being left in bins

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News of Note: Russian cities introduce baby ‘drop boxes’ to stop unwanted children being left in bins

Anonymous baby drop boxes have been introduced for the first time in Russia.

The Krasnodar Territory in south Russia bought five of the so-called baby drop boxes in the beginning of November so mothers could drop off unwanted children anonymously.

The first three were installed in Sochi, Novorossiysk, and Armavir, and by the end of the month one child had already been left.

The move was aimed at providing sanitary conditions for unwanted children, instead of ‘having them left in garbage containers, health officials told Ria Novosti.

Elena Redko, the head of the Krasnodar Health Department, told the news service the first child to be left, a baby girl, was healthy and would be passed to childcare officials.

It is unfortunate that any society would need these baby “drop boxes,” but it seems like a necessary evil. In a perfect world full of accessible birth control and sexual education, hopefully we wouldn’t need these at all. These drop boxes are not some new Russian concept, similar programs exist all over the world. (In the U.S., all the states have Safe Haven Laws allowing newborns to be left anonymously in hospitals and fire stations.)

I didn’t realize how easy (in the legal sense) it was for a mother to anonymously get rid of a child. How do you feel about the existence of these baby drop boxes? Please share your thoughts in the comments below.

Jack Diehl

Jack Diehl

Jack Diehl has been deeply involved in growth of virtual worlds for over a decade, from multiplayer role playing games into platforms for social interaction and artistic expression. Jack is fascinated by the freedom of speech and memes people are exhibiting online and is dedicated to seeing these freedoms protected in Real Life. Jack sees the Internet as history's greatest asset for growth; creating a new age of reason and accountability.
Jack Diehl