Global Sexual Freedom Watch

Global Sexual Freedom Watch

The struggle for the civil rights for women, sexual minorities, and people who are HIV+ outside of the United States, in hundreds of countries, involves fierce protection against imprisonment, mutilation, violence, and death. The abuse of power is monumental, and first world countries mostly sit idly by while this miscarriage of humanity is put forward by governments, religions, commerce, and often vile social custom. This alone should make every American care about this silent genocide, the systematic "disappearing" of people who are HIV+ or lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender and gender-nonconforming (LGBT) and severe restrictions on the rights of women. Read More

Call for Justice

In 2006, I went to Congo and was fascinated to see observe what I had been taught in school about the eruption of volcano mountains. People in this part of the country have been experiencing unending wars. Wars in and out, whether they are from within or out, or their own making or imposed on them. On top of the wars, then the eruption of the Virunga Mountains covering the whole city, ending in Lake Kivu. Luckily enough, people didn’t die because they were warned in advance but nothing of the property left behind was recovered. The airport was ...

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A Wake Up Call! — Kushaba Moses Mworeko

Since last May when the Anti-Homosexuality Bill in Uganda seemed dead with the end of the 7th Parliament, Ugandan and international LGBT activists grassroots organizers and the media felt a relief from what had become a “talk of the town” issue. Speculations on the reintroduction of the bill were rumored when the key sponsor of the bill, Member of Parliament David Bahati, was said to be a presidential nominee to Uganda’s Cabinet as its new Minister of Ethics and Integrity. We shouldn’t forget that the death of this bill was in our sights when some Cabinet ministers and President ...

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Why sexual freedom is the bedrock of all freedoms

(También en Español) Our sexual pleasure response is completely individual. When we feel it, those precious moments, we experience unbridled exhilaration that is at the same time indescribable by mere words, even in great art or poetry. There is only one way to replicate this experience of unrestrained freedom and that is to recreate -- re-create increasing favorable circumstances to plug in at a healthy pace. Although sexual pleasure exists by definition in a time and space all one's own an imperative to share it and enhance it with others is built in. Studies have demonstrated over and over again ...

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We are our pride – Kushaba Moses Mworeko

It was June 5, 1981, when the first cases of HIV were reported (CDC.gov). Yes, in the USA, this was referred to as a gay disease and to some people it still is. But to a person like me who comes from a place where the disease was and is heavily among heterosexuals, I have to disagree. As years have gone by, education and awareness campaigns and research on this disease have helped to dispel the myths. It has taken years for Africans to understand that a witch doctor’s diagnosis and prescription of expensive sacrifices for this disease were not ...

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What lies in our power — Kushaba Moses Mworeko

A few days ago I was watching CBS's "Criminal Minds" and the show ended with this quote, “What lies in our power to do, lies in our power not to do,” which I remember from reading Aristotle’s writings. It reminded me also of what most people have been asking me over the last 17 months: Moses, what do you intend to do? I have not been answering this question well because of the uncertainty surrounding my future. Being in limbo for over a year has taught me a lot. My patience, assertiveness, and aggressiveness were all put to the test. These ...

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No call for celebration – Kushaba Moses Mworeko

Editor's note: Moses has this month received official notice that he has qualified for U.S. asylum, finally. He will post something trying to capture his personal joy soon, but here republished is his post from April when the Ugandan bill was again in flux, showing how important it is to be thinking globally about human rights. Also see Will O'Bryan's spotlight on Moses today in Metro Weekly and visit Moses' Global Sexual Freedom Annotated Bibliography in our Library for more information.   Even as Uganda's government shows it might shelve its “kill the gays” bill, there can be no call ...

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On The Brutal Murder of David Kato-by Kushaba Moses Mworeko

The brutal and horrific death of Ugandan Human Rights Defender David Kato is a blow to our efforts fightinginjustice in Uganda and the world over. David's charisma can never be replaced, however his death gives us more strength than ever to fight on. Unfortunately David's death has become part of the price that we have to pay to win full equality. I send a strong message to those exporters of hate to our already vulnerable communities to stop it lest the world return to the dark ages. Let us pledge to fight to keep his spirit alive and help bring equality and freedom for ...

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What Sexual Freedom Means To Me – Kushaba Moses Mworeko

To me Sexual Freedom is the inherent liberty of people to embrace our God-given, beautiful, and sexy bodies, sexual organs, feelings and acts. I look  at myself  as “a free and empowered person” working to emancipate LGBT and HIV-positive people in Uganda, Africa, and elsewhere from a life of bondage into a world of freedom, liberty, diversity, and respect for all experiences. As adults, mature people, productive citizens, and observers of the law can we have sex with whomever, whenever, wherever,however we want? Can we lay a foundation for the young and the generations to come to have and enjoy all the ...

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Kushaba Moses Mworeko: International Sexual Freedom Advocate

Kushaba Moses Mworeko is no stranger to adversity. After losing both his parents and newborn sister to AIDS-related illness as a teenager in Uganda, Moses took it upon himself to raise his five younger siblings, eventually putting himself and his brothers through college in his home country. Despite being repeatedly harassed, his dedication, moral resolve, and religious faith helped him to successfully pursue a Master’s Degree at Uganda’s Christian University. It was here, while preparing for a career in Child and Maternal Health, that a snooping secretary uncovered a private email correspondence between Moses and a male friend, a discovery that resulted in the loss of his teaching position, as well as the escalation of suspicion, persecution, and threats of violence on the part of his fellow citizens in the virulently anti-gay cultural climate of Uganda.